Texas Castle Doctrine – What Does It Mean?

Texas Castle Doctrine – What Does It Mean?

Important article that all gunowners in Texas need to understand. You want to be clear about the ‘Castle Doctrine’ and when you can legitimately use lethal force to protect yourself.

Friday morning’s shooting has raised questions about homeowners’ rights when it comes to protecting themselves.

Under Texas law, a homeowner can shoot and kill an intruder, but there has to be a reason.

Robert Powell is a firearms instructor certified by the National Rifle Association. He teaches at the “Best of the West” shooting range in Liberty Hill. For him, a loaded gun serves not only as protection, but as a right he’s proud to have.

Under a rarely-used legal defense called the’ Castle Doctrine,’ a person has a right to shoot and kill an intruder.

“The intent should not be to kill, but to stop the threat,” Powell said.

Criminal Defense Lawyer David Sheppard said the doctrine is not always clear cut. The law is designed to protect a person during a home invasion or violent attack, but the shooter will likely have to justify why the trigger was pulled. If a jury doesn’t buy it, they could face murder charges. . . .

Read more here.

Iowa Considers Castle Doctrine – State Legislature Considers Removing ‘Duty to Retreat’

Iowa Considers Castle Doctrine – State Legislature Considers Removing ‘Duty to Retreat’

Important changes to self-defense law in Iowa, otherwise known as the Castle Doctrine.

Iowa is one of the states that requires you to pretty much be cornered to use deadly force. Yesterday, the legislature made steps to correct that lunacy. The state House Public Safety Committee passed House File 573 by a 14 to 7 vote. The legislation will now be sent to the House floor for consideration.

House File 573 would remove a person’s “duty to retreat” from an attacker, allowing law-abiding citizens to stand their ground and protect themselves or their family anywhere they are lawfully present. It would create a presumption that an individual who unlawfully or forcefully enters your dwelling, place of business or employment, or occupied vehicle is there to cause serious bodily injury or death, so the occupant may use force, including deadly force, against that person. HF 573 also would expressly enhance the protections against criminal prosecution and civil lawsuits when justifiable force is used.

Read more here.